April 23, 2024
Decathlon plans to open 10 stores annually in India

Decathlon plans to open 10 stores annually in India

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Paris: Decathlon, the renowned French sports brand, has set its sights on India, aiming to make it one of its top five markets within the next five years. The company plans to open 10 new stores in India every year, said Steve Dykes, chief retail and countries officer.
He said this on the sidelines of an event in Paris, where the company unveiled its new logo, known as the “orbit”, and a new brand identity.Dykes highlighted the potential of India’s vast domestic market, noting that 60% of Decathlon products sold in India are already made in the country. “We want to get to 90% to 95%, if possible,” Dykes said. “India is already in the top 10 markets and we want it to get into the top five. I feel we are really on the right track at the moment. And let’s hope within the five years it will be in the top five,” he added. The company has 122 stores in 19 states.
Decathlon is keen to ensure the sustainability of its products and aims to source components as close to India as possible. This aligns with ‘Make in India’ initiative, which the company has been supporting since Modi’s tenure as CM of Gujarat. Dykes also emphasised the changing sporting culture in India, with an increasing number of people choosing sports as a career.
Barbara Martin Coppola, global CEO of Decathlon, stressed the importance of making sports enjoyable and accessible. She highlighted the role of sports in promoting health and well-being, especially in a rapidly changing world marked by increasing stress, sedentary lifestyles, and overconsumption.
(The writer was in Paris at the invitation of Decathlon)



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